Friday, January 18, 2019

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks - Week 3 - Unusual Name - Tangney

This year I have decided to take part in Amy Johnson Crow's 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks blogging prompts. 

The theme for Week 3 (Jan. 15-21) is: Unusual Name.

For this week's theme, I have chosen one of the more uncommon surnames in my family tree - Tangney. 

About the Tangney Surname

While the surname might be fairly rare across the world, it isn't particularly uncommon in County Kerry. An exact search for the surname Tangney in the Church records at Irishgenealogy.ie  reveals 1340 baptism records and 322 marriage records, predominantly in County Kerry. 

My 3 x great grandmother was Honora (Tangney) McCarthy (c1806-1873)

About Honora Tangney

According to her 1873 Victorian death certificate, Honora Tangney was born about 1806 in County Kerry, Ireland, the daughter of Patrick Tangney and Julia (Cronin) Tangney

Honora married John McCarthy on 26 February 1832 in the Catholic parish of Firies/Molahiff. The marriage witnesses were Nicholas Tangney (perhaps a brother of Honora?) and James Burk. 

A curious 1801 Tangney baptism exists in the records for the neighbouring Catholic parish of Killeentierna. The existing records for this parish at that time are a modern transcript. 
For 17 December 1801, the transcript lists the baptism of "Nicholas Tangney, [residence] Cumer, [parents] Batt +   ___Cronin" Might the original have possibly said Patt [Patrick] rather than Batt [Bartholomew]? Could this Nicholas potentially be Honora's brother?  

John and Honora (Tangney) McCarthy immigrated to Victoria, Australia in 1866.

John McCarthy died at Golden Gully, Heathcote, Victoria on 22 June 1870. 

Honora (Tangney) McCarthy died at Golden Gully, Heathcote on 4 November 1873, at the age of 67 years.

Please see Honora (Tangney) McCarthy's Wikitree Profile for sources for this post. 

© 2019. Australian Genealogy Journeys. This post was originally published at https://ausgenjourneys.blogspot.com/2019/01/52-ancestors-in-52-weeks-week-3-unusual.html
52 Ancestors in 52 weeks is © Amy Johnson Crow

Friday, January 11, 2019

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks - Week 2 - Challenge - James Potter

This year I have decided to take part in Amy Johnson Crow's 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks blogging prompts. 

The theme for Week 2 (Jan. 8-14) is: Challenge.

For this week's theme, I have chosen to write about an ancestor who is a challenge to find, my 4 x great grandfather James Potter

What do I know about James Potter?
James Potter, a bachelor, married Mary Hutton, a spinster, by Banns, on 1 January 1811 in the parish of St Peter in the East, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England. 

James, a cabinet maker/carpenter, and Mary had the following children:

The 1813 and 1814 baptisms of James and Edward stated that the family lived 'opposite St John's College'. 

I found the following notice of insolvency for James Potter in the Newspapers collection at FindMyPast. A notice appeared in the Oxford University and City Herald on 31 August 1822 (page 3, column 3) stating the following:
INSOLVENT DEBTORS' COURT OFFICE
No 33, Lincoln's Inn Fields.
PETITIONS of INSOLVENT DEBTORS to
be heard at the Adjourned General Quarter Sessions
of the Peace, to be holden at the Grand Jury Room, in the
Town-hall, Oxford, in and for the County of Oxford, on the
21st day of September next, at the hour of 12 at noon.
HENRY BASSETT, late of Middle Barton, in the County
of Oxford, Labourer.
JAMES POTTER, late of the City of Oxford, Carpenter
and Joiner.
WILLIAM YOUNG, formerly of Wescott Barton, in the
County of Oxford, Farmer; and late of Oddington, in the
same County, Farmer.
The Petitions and Schedules are files and may be in-
spected at this Office every Monday, Wednesday, and Fri-
day, between the hours of ten and four - Two days' notice
of any intention to oppose any prisoner's discharge, must be
given to such prisoner, to entitle any Creditor to oppose the
same.  JAMES NICHOLLS.
Bennett-Street, Blackfriars-road.
Mary (Hutton) Potter, James' wife, died in about January 1826. She was buried on 19 January 1826 in the parish of St Peter in the East, Oxford. The parish register gave her abode at that time as 'King Street'. 

After that my knowledge of James is patchy and unconfirmed. 

Unconfirmed sightings of James Potter 

There is a probable second marriage for James in 1827. James Potter married Sarah Davis on 23 December 1827, St Ebbe, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England, United Kingdom. The parish register does not state whether this James was a bachelor or a widower. 

James' sons Edward and George later lived in London during the 1840s and early 1850s. 
The marriage record for George's first marriage, to Mary Ann Stone, on 21 December 1840, at St Mary, Rotherhithe, Surrey, stated that George's father was James Potter, Carpenter.
The marriage record for George's second marriage, to Amelia Preston, on Christmas Day (25 December) 1848, at St James, Bermondsey, Surrey, stated that his father was James Potter, Deceased. This appeared to confirm that James Potter died sometime between 21 December 1840 and 25 December 1848. 

I thought perhaps I would find James in London also, as I had not been able to locate him in Oxford after 1827. I searched the Census records for 1841 for any Potter's living in the same vicinity of London where George's marriages took place. I thought I had found my James Potter when I discovered: James Potter, 55, Carpenter, not born in county, in the same household as Sarah Potter, 55, not born in county, living in the parish of St Mary Newington, Surrey. I then discovered the death of this James Potter, on 5 August 1843, at Potter's Place, Uxbridge Street, St Mary Newington, Surrey. The death certificate for this James Potter stated that he was a Carpenter, aged 57 years. He was buried on 13 August 1843 in the parish of St Mary Newington. 

However, after going back over some existing research, including a copy of a death certificate sent to me by a Potter cousin, I have realised that something doesn't add up.

A Sarah Potter died at the Oxford Workhouse on 21 January 1856 and was buried in the parish of St Giles, Oxford, on 26 January 1856. Her death certificate stated that she was 62 years of age and the "Widow of - Potter Cabinet Maker" Probably this same Sarah Potter who appeared in the 1851 Census in the Oxford Workhouse. 
Sarah Potter, pauper, w [widow], 56, servant, [born] Oxford. 
So far this would make sense, she could still possibly be the same Sarah Potter married to James Potter who died in 1843 in the parish of St Mary Newington?
However, the 1841 Census shows the following person in the Oxford Workhouse. 
Sarah Potter, 45, -, y [born in the county]
So this certainly doesn't add up. I feel, given that this Sarah is in Oxford, she is more likely to be the Sarah who married James Potter in Oxford in 1827. Her death certificate in 1856 described her as the 'widow of - Potter Cabinet Maker', so we know she was a Sarah married to a Cabinet Maker named Potter - very likely James Potter. 

This leaves me believing I may have may found the completely wrong death for James Potter in St Mary Newington, Surrey, in 1843. He was just coincidentally a James Potter, Carpenter, married to a Sarah, born out of the county of Surrey, living in the same vicinity of London where my James Potter's son George married during the 1840s. 

I have been unable to confirm when James Potter was born, though there is a particular Potter family I suspect are close relatives, including an Ann Potter, a spinster, who died aged 71 years in February 1834.  She lived on King Street, Oxford, which is where Mary (Hutton) Potter was living when she died in 1826. 

References for this research are available on James Potter's Wikitree profile

James Potter is certainly a challenge to find. 


© 2019. Australian Genealogy Journeys. This post was originally published at https://ausgenjourneys.blogspot.com/2019/01/52-ancestors-in-52-weeks-week-2.html
52 Ancestors in 52 weeks is © Amy Johnson Crow

Tuesday, January 1, 2019

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks - Week 1 - First

Happy New Year!
This year I have decided to take part in Amy Johnson Crow's 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks blogging prompts. 

The theme for Week 1 (Jan. 1-7) is: First.

One of Amy's suggestions for this weeks theme is: 

Who was the first ancestor to arrive in the country? 

My first ancestors to arrive in Australia were my 3 x great-grandparents, William Fullerton and Mary (Dunne) Fullerton. They arrived at Port Phillip (Melbourne) on 30 September 1840 on the barque Himalaya

You can read more about the Fullerton's on my Fullerton Family History blog: A Summary of the Fullerton story.

© 2019. Australian Genealogy Journeys. This post was originally published at https://ausgenjourneys.blogspot.com/2019/01/52-ancestors-in-52-weeks-week-1.html
52 Ancestors in 52 weeks is © Amy Johnson Crow

Friday, December 28, 2018

My Genealogy Library at LibraryThing

In this blog's previous existence, back in 2010-2013, I created a catalogue of my genealogy books on LibraryThing. I rediscovered that catalogue again today and have added the LibraryThing widget to the sidebar of my blog.
© 2018. Australian Genealogy Journeys. This post was originally published at https://ausgenjourneys.blogspot.com/2018/12/my-genealogy-library-at-librarything.html

Sunday, December 23, 2018

A Surname Table

I have just been reading Our Surname Tables for DNA Research at the Family History Fanatics blog. I saw a link to that post on Facebook today and thought that I would try to create a surname table too. 

Here is the resulting table:



I decided to create a second table, colour coding the surnames with the country of birth of that ancestor. 



This colour coded surname table demonstrates that most of the 'gaps' at the 4th great-grandparent level are in Ireland, due to the scarcity of Irish records in the early 1800s and before. Additionally, it illustrates how I can have so many 5th-to-distant-cousin DNA matches with no known shared surnames, because I have 17 4th great grandparents with an unknown surname. 

© 2018. Australian Genealogy Journeys. This post was originally published at https://ausgenjourneys.blogspot.com/2018/12/a-surname-table.html
The idea for the surname table came from 
Our Surname Tables for DNA Research at the Family History Fanatics blog.

Wednesday, December 19, 2018

Update - 11 DNA Circles at AncestryDNA

Back in July this year I blogged an update about my number of DNA Circles at Ancestry - Update- 8 DNA Circles at AncestryDNA.

Since then I have a further three DNA circles


The three new DNA circles are from the paternal side of my family.

DNA circles on Ancestry only show if DNA matches also have a public family tree attached to their DNA results and their ancestor's names with the same spelling etc. 

I have identified my most recent common ancestor (MRCA) with many other DNA matches at Ancestry, but they don't appear in my DNA circles as they have slight differences in their family tree (spelling etc.) or they don't have a family tree. 


© 2018. Australian Genealogy Journeys. This post was originally published at https://ausgenjourneys.blogspot.com/2018/12/update-11-dna-circles-at-ancestrydna.html

Saturday, December 15, 2018

Genealogy Do-Over - My Year In Review

This year I took part in the Genealogy Do-Over.
I have decided to review all my Genealogy Do-Over posts for the year, to reflect on what I have learned and what I still have to learn, as well as the tasks I still have to complete. 

In January 2018 the Genealogy Do-Over topics were: Setting Previous Research Aside and Preparing To Research.

What have I learned?
  • I put aside my previous genealogy research. I placed all my genealogy files on my computer into a folder and labelled it 'Genealogy Hold'. I did the same for all my genealogy related notes in Evernote. I created a Notebook and labelled it 'Genealogy Hold'
What do I still have to learn and do?
  • I still need to learn to resist the lure of any 'bright and shiny objects' (BSOs). I have noticed that I can still be distracted by new resources or sudden ideas, especially when I am feeling a little tired of analysing documents.
In February 2018 the Genealogy Do-Over topics were: Establishing Base Practices and Guidelines and Setting Research Goals

The Base Practices and Guidelines that I decided on in February were as follows:
  • Plan my research 
  • Follow a research process 
  • Work from the known to the unknown
  • Learn about the history and geography of the areas where my ancestors lived
  • Slow down. One objective at a time, one person at a time, one family at a time.
  • Keep a research log
  • Record Sources, cite correctly, give credit
  • Try to see the original document (or images of the original document) 
  • Record every detail from every record
  • Track everything - what found and what not found, correspondence etc.
  • Analyse sources, resolve any conflicts
  • Be consistent in the way I record my data.
  • Backup my data
  • Share my research
  • Keep learning

What have I learned?

  • I planned my own genealogy research process workflow (using examples from other genealogy researchers) with steps for preparing, planning, researching, analysing, resolving, concluding, saving and sharing. 
  • I believe I have so far kept to the Base Practices and Guidelines that I wrote on my blog here in February, though in some aspects I still need more experience and practice (see below).
What do I still have to learn and do?

  • I need some more experience in planning and tracking my research, though I have made plans for how I will conduct these aspects of the research process. So far my Genealogy Do-Over has consisted mainly of going through documents I have already acquired (that were saved to my Genealogy Hold folder) so I have not yet had to plan new research.
  • I also need more experience in learning about the history and geography of the areas where my ancestors lived. I hope to create Location Guides for particular places where my ancestors lived, to help me to understand the geography and history and the available resources for the areas.
In March 2018 the Genealogy Do-Over topics were: Conducting Self-Interview and Conducting Family Interviews.

What have I learned?

  • I started with myself and my own immediate family and wrote down my own recollections of events in my life and the lives of my family members.
In April 2018 the Genealogy Do-Over topics were: Tracking Research and Conducting Research.

What have I learned?

  • In April I decided to use Evernote for my research log. At the time I was unsure whether that would work for me. I have since decided to use an Excel spreadsheet for my research log. 
In May 2018 the Genealogy Do-Over topics were: Citing Sources and Building a Research Toolbox.

What have I learned?

  • I learned to add a source citation for each source I consult and record it on my research log. When I finally add the data gleaned from that source to Family Historian I know now where to find the source citation. 
  • I created a Research Toolbox using bookmarks saved in Evernote (for less frequently used genealogy resources) in combination with bookmarks saved in Google Chrome (for frequently used genealogy resources). 
In June 2018 the Genealogy Do-Over topics were: Evaluating Evidence and Reviewing Online Education Options

What have I learned?

  • I have continued to use Evidentia to aid in the task of evaluating evidence from the genealogy source documents I consult.
What do I still have to learn and do?

  • I need to take up opportunities for online genealogy education. 
In July 2018 the Genealogy Do-Over topics were: Reviewing Genealogy Database Software and Digitizing Photos and Documents.

What have I learned?

  • I have continued to use Family Historian was my main genealogy database software.
What do I still have to learn?

In August 2018 the Genealogy Do-Over topics were: Conducting Collateral Research and Reviewing Offline Education Options

What have I learned?

  • I have learned more about the usefulness of collateral research (research on ancestor's siblings, in-laws etc.)
What do I still have to learn and do?

  • I need to put the concepts of collateral research into practice. As I progress with my Genealogy Do-Over I can add information found in collateral research to Wikitree, as I feel that is the best way to share this type of research with others so it can benefit other researchers. 
  • I need to make an inventory of my genealogy books and journals. 
In September 2018 the Genealogy Do-Over topics were: Conducting Cluster Research and Organizing Research Materials - Documents and Photos

What have I learned?
  • I have learned more about the usefulness of cluster research (research on ancestor's extended family, associates, neighbours etc.)
  • I have learned about the importance of correctly organising and storing physical research materials such as documents and photos.
What do I still have to learn and do?
  • I need to put the concepts of cluster research into practice. Similarly to collateral research, as I progress with my Genealogy Do-Over I can add information found in cluster research to Wikitree, where it can benefit other researchers. 
  • I still need to purchase some archival quality photo albums for storing family photographs.
  • I need to sort through the folders of my Mum's handwritten family history research, scan or photograph items and assign them to either the 'keep' pile (for certificates and photographs etc.) or to the 'recycle' pile (for scraps of paper with research notes that can be discarded once scanned or photographed)
In October 2018 the Genealogy Do-Over topics were: Reviewing DNA Testing Options and Organizing Research Materials - Digital

What have I learned?

  • I reviewed the tools I am using for interpreting my DNA test results.
  • I decided on naming conventions for my genealogy digital files. 
  • I decided on conventions for my use of metadata in my genealogy digital files.
  • I decided on my folder organisation for my genealogy digital files.
What do I still have to learn and do?

  • Explore using DNA Painter to illustrate the DNA segments I have confirmed from shared segments with known relatives.
In November 2018 the Genealogy Do-Over topics were: Reviewing Social Media Options, Building a Research Network and Reviewing Research Travel Options

What have I learned?

  • I learned about genealogy options on social media, the usefulness of building a research network and about travelling for genealogy research.
  • I have since visited a cemetery where many of my ancestors are buried. I had been to this cemetery before, but this trip, with my mother and aunt, was specifically to photograph the memorials for my ancestors and relatives.
In December 2018 the Genealogy Do-Over topics were: Sharing Research and Securing Research Data

What have I learned?

  • I have learned the importance of sharing my research and keeping my research data secure. 
What do I still have to learn and do?

  • Finally compile the history of the family of William and Mary (Dunne) Fullerton. I will aim to have this printed before October 2020.
  • Share my research on this blog, on Wikitree and on the Facebook groups I created for descendants of various of my ancestors. 
  • create a backup plan for my emails and for my Evernote notes
  • create a plan to 'future proof' my data
  • create inventories of all my genealogy related items both physical and digital
  • estate planning - discuss with my family what will happen to my genealogy research when I have left this life.


The full list of Genealogy Do-Over topics for 2018 is on Thomas MacEntee's Abundant Genealogy web site.

© 2018. Australian Genealogy Journeys. This post was originally posted at https://ausgenjourneys.blogspot.com/2018/12/genealogy-do-over-my-year-in-review.html
Genealogy Do-Over is © Thomas MacEntee.

Genealogy Do-Over - December 2018

I am taking part in the Genealogy Do-Over this year. 


The Genealogy Do-Over tasks for December are:

  1. Sharing Research
  2. Securing Research Data

1. Sharing Research

One of my motivations for starting the Genealogy Do-Over at the beginning of this year was that I wanted my years of research to be neatly collected with all sources cited, then I could finally share my research with others without worrying excessively about whether I may have made a mistake or whether I correctly cited sources and acknowledged previous research correctly.

I have finally started to add information to my new genealogy database in Family Historian. I am going through my previous research document by document, making sure to analyse the documents for all the evidence they contain, then correctly cite the source and add the facts to my Family Historian database. If I do it right the first time, I don't have to worry about going back over my research later.

I started with myself and my parents and my immediate family. I then decided to focus on my paternal grandmother's family. Going through each document I noticed the dates I download some of the certificates - 2004. I decided way back then that I wanted to compile a history of the family of William and Mary (Dunne) Fullerton. A family reunion was held in October 2010 (the 170th anniversary of the family's arrival in Australia) to bring the family together and gather photographs and information. Here I am at the end of 2018 and I haven't compiled the history yet. I have set out to many times, organising all the source documents in chronological order, writing plans and creating chapter titles. Then I procrastinate, take up other research and distractions, or other aspects of life interfere. I want to finally achieve my goal of sharing this history of the Fullerton Family. I feel I have disappointed myself and others by leaving this incomplete. Relatives who willingly contributed their knowledge of the family have since passed away, and I especially feel I have disappointed them. Perhaps a good goal would be to aim to have the history printed before the 180th anniversary of the families arrival in Australia in October 2020?


The information I have gathered over the last 15 years cannot continue to hide away on my computer. I need to share my research. This month's first topic for the Genealogy Do-over is, therefore, one I take very seriously. I have spent years of my life on this research but it does not belong to me, it belongs to all the descendants of my ancestors. I need to remember that while my research can never be perfect, I can still share it with others and direct them to the sources I consulted.

My goals for sharing my research will be:
  • Finally to compile the history of the family of William and Mary (Dunne) Fullerton. Aim to have this printed before October 2020.
  • Share my research on this blog, on Wikitree and on the Facebook groups I created for descendants of various of my ancestors. 

2. Securing Research Data

I have already set up several backups for my genealogy research.  This month's Genealogy Do-Over task inspired me to write a Backup plan so I that I have a written record of what I need to backup and where I need to backup to. 

I created a note in Evernote for this Backup plan which included details about how and where I backup my data from Family Historian, Evidentia, Genome Mate Pro, and my dedicated Genealogy folder (and all the files it contains). My Backup plan involves using GoodSync and backing up to both an external hard drive and to storage on the Cloud

Things I still need to do to secure my research data include:

  • create a backup plan for my emails and for my Evernote notes
  • create a plan to 'future proof' my data
  • create inventories of all my genealogy related items both physical and digital
  • estate planning - discuss with my family what will happen to my genealogy research when I have left this life.


The full list of Genealogy Do-Over topics for 2018 is on Thomas MacEntee's Abundant Genealogy web site.


© 2018. Australian Genealogy Journeys. This post was originally posted at https://ausgenjourneys.blogspot.com/2018/12/genealogy-do-over-december-2018.html
Genealogy Do-Over is © Thomas MacEntee.

Thursday, November 1, 2018

Genealogy Do-Over - November 2018

I am taking part in the Genealogy Do-Over this year. 


  1. Reviewing Social Media Options
  2. Building a Research Network
  3. Reviewing Research Travel Options

1. Reviewing Social Media Options

About 8 years ago, before I decided to have a 'genealogy blog do-over', this blog and I were active in genealogy social media - Facebook, Google+, Twitter, Pinterest. 

With challenges in other areas of life, and because I was following too many social media feeds, I found myself quite overwhelmed with information and suffering from a sort of 'genealogy burn out'. I decided to cut back quite a lot. I stopped reading blogs all the time and stopped using Google+, Twitter and Pinterest. I continued on Facebook but limited the number of pages and groups I was following. I am hoping to continue this way but I am always on the watch for 'information overload'. If the noise becomes a bit too much, I know I need to cut back and simplify. 

I have had a look at one of the resources recommended for this months task - the Genealogy on Facebook List. There are quite a lot of groups and pages to listed there for people just starting out exploring genealogy social media. My best advice is to remember not to overwhelm yourself by trying to follow too many things at once!

2. Building a Research Network

My steps to Building my Research Network at this stage are -
  • This blog
  • Facebook - Following a manageable number of genealogy groups and pages, and creating groups for descendants of my ancestors (I have a couple of these so far, some more successful than others). 
  • Wikitree - I still feel like quite a newbie at Wikitree, especially to the collaborative side of the site, but I hope that I can continue to contribute and learn. 

3. Reviewing Research Travel Options

I don't travel often, for several reasons, but I hope to make a few small genealogy research trips in the future. With my genealogy do-over in mind, the first thing I need to do is to travel to the cemeteries, buildings (or the locations where the buildings used to be) and landscapes that relate to my closest ancestors - my parents, my grandparents, great grandparents etc. I will start with the locations that are closest to where I live. 

Travelling overseas to the UK and Ireland to explore the places my more distant ancestors lived and to access archival sources not online, is unfortunately not something I expect to be able to do. Thankfully technology such as Google Earth allows me to virtually explore locations I would otherwise be unable to visit. And there is an ever-increasing amount of archival documents being digitised and made available online. 

The recommendations for do-it-yourself research trips listed in this months genealogy do-over tasks are useful to keep them in mind.  

A good plan for my research trips will be essential. I will have to make sure the goals for the research trip are specific and achievable within the time frame. Checklists will be a great help too. What do I want to photograph? Whose grave do I expect to find at that cemetery? Do I know the location of the grave? I need to ask all these questions and more before I head out on any genealogy journeys. 

The full list of Genealogy Do-Over topics for 2018 is on Thomas MacEntee's Abundant Genealogy web site.

© 2018. Australian Genealogy Journeys. This post was originally posted at https://ausgenjourneys.blogspot.com/2018/11/genealogy-do-over-november-2018.html
Genealogy Do-Over is © Thomas MacEntee.

Tuesday, October 2, 2018

Genealogy Do-Over - October 2018

I am taking part in the Genealogy Do-Over this year. 


  1. Reviewing DNA Testing Options
  2. Organizing Research Materials – Digital

    1. Reviewing DNA Testing Options

    I am already familiar with DNA testing options as I have tested with Family Tree DNA (in 2012), Ancestry DNA and LivingDNA. I have also transferred my DNA results to MyHeritage and Gedmatch.

    For those already familiar with DNA testing options, Thomas MacEntee suggests for this months genealogy do-over task that we make sure we are "using all the possible tools at your disposal for interpreting and connecting with others".

    The tools I currently use the most are Genome Mate Pro and DNAGedcom Client. I have also started to use DNA Painter and I am interested to try the bulk import functionality.

    I have used the following Chrome extensions to help with my DNA research:

    I have also used Shelley Crawford's NodeXL techniques to visualise my DNA matches from AncestryDNA. You can learn more at Shelley's blog Twigs of Yore and on the Facebook group Network Graphs for Genetic Genealogy.

    I have also tried Visual Phasing, as my father and two of his siblings have DNA tested. You can learn more about Visual Phasing as the Facebook group The Visual Phasing Working Group.

    I also recommend using Wikitree for DNA research.

    Other Facebook groups I recommend:



    2. Organizing Research Materials - Digital

    Naming Conventions

    After looking at many examples from other researchers I have decided on the following naming conventions for my digital files. 

    SURNAME_Given names_Year Born_Year of Record_Record Type

    If the file relates to more than one person - a marriage record, for example - I will first name the file with the groom's name as follows:


    SURNAME Groom_Given names Groom_Year Born _Year of Record_Record Type 


    Then I will create a shortcut to that file and name it for the wife as follows:

    SURNAME Wife_Given names Wife_Year Born_Year of Record_Record Type - Shortcut

    Here is the marriage certificate image file and marriage certificate transcript file for my great grandparents as an example. 




    For documents related to a married woman, I will save the file under the surname used in the document but will also create a shortcut to the document using the woman's maiden surname. 

    If the document uses a different spelling for the surname than usual, I will save the document under the spelling of the surname used in the document but also include a shortcut using the usual surname spelling. 

    Metadata

    After reading about Metadata I have decided on a Metadata Workflow as follows:
    Title: Name of File
    Subject: Record Type (I will progressively create a master list of record types, under the categories as described on the FamilySearch Wiki)
    Rate: a rating of the quality of the image
    Tags: 

    • Record_Type e.g. marriage_certificate
    • Event e.g. marriage
    • Individual Name e.g. smith_jameswilliam_1872
    • Locality e.g. elmore
    • Dates (Year) e.g. 1910
    • Surname e.g. smith 

    Comments: Source citation
    Authors: original authors e.g. Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages Victoria
    Date taken: if relevant, the exact date of document/event
    Date acquired: Date the image was downloaded or scanned.
    Copyright: if relevant e.g. FamilySearch and include a link to the catalogue entry

    Folder Organisation

    I have decided to use a folder naming system based on the record types described on the FamilySearch Wiki
    The main folders, under GENEALOGY, will be:

    1. Finding Aids
    2. Background Information
    3. Compiled Records
    4. Original Records
    I anticipate that most of my files will be saved in the folder "4. Original Records".
    There will be subfolders within that folder as follows:
    1. Vital Records
    2. Residency
    3. Ownership
    4. Occupation
    5. Immigration
    6. Civil Action
    7. Institutions
    8. Special Groups
    9. Personal
    I won't have any further subfolders under these folders but I will save all relevant files under one folder for each record type. For example, in the '1. Vital Records'  folder I will save records related to any of the following (as listed on the FamilySearch Wiki) :
    • Birth Records
    • Marriage Records
    • Death Records
    • Church Records
    • Cemetery Records
    • Funeral Records
    • Obituaries
    • Divorce Records
    • Newspaper notices for vital events

    I will be able to sort them easily using Metadata. 

    If this file system doesn't work well for me I may decide to change it in the future. 

    Backup Plan 

    The primary copy of my genealogy information will be in a folder called GENEALOGY on my desktop.
    I will then use GoodSync to backup the GENEALOGY folder to a second hard drive and to the cloud.



    The full list of Genealogy Do-Over topics for 2018 is on Thomas MacEntee's Abundant Genealogy web site.

    © 2018. Australian Genealogy Journeys. This post was originally posted at https://ausgenjourneys.blogspot.com/2018/10/genealogy-do-over-october-2018.html
    Genealogy Do-Over is © Thomas MacEntee.