Tuesday, August 28, 2012

Trove Tuesday - Missing Mares at Elphinstone

Amy of the Branches Leaves & Pollen blog has come up with a brilliant new blogging prompt for Australian geneabloggers - Trove Tuesday (With thanks also to Jill at Geniaus and Fi at Dance Skeletons for alerting me to Amy's idea).

I have decided to join in with this blogging prompt each Tuesday. This should be great motivation to finally begin organising the tumultuous tangle of Trove tags I have accumulated since 2008. This should also be a motivation to help me achieve one of my neglected Goals for 2012 which was to 'Contribute text corrections more often on Trove'. 

My first contribution to Trove Tuesday will be one of the first interesting (if confusing) articles that I found through Trove about one of my ancestors. 'Wm. Fullarton' mentioned in the article is my 3 x Great Grandfather, William Fullerton.  
1855 'CASTLEMAINE.', The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956),
13 April, p. 5,
viewed 27 August, 2012,
http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4806666

CASTLEMAINE.

(FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT.)

10th April, 1855.

Resuming my report of the Sessions here, I may remark on the lightness of the calendar, which has proved to be much lighter than it appeared to be at first sight, especially as to the absence of any deep or deadly crimes, which speaks greatly in favor of the moral condition of these gold-fields generally.

W.H. Smith was charged with horse stealing. The prisoner, who is well known as late landlord of the Carriers' Arms, challenged two jurymen. The Crown Prosecutor presented two counts in the indictment, one for the felony, and another for the unlawful use of the animals, to the injury of the owner. There were two mares taken from the paddock of Wm. Fullarton, a near neighbor of the prisoner's, at Elphinstone. The complainant, on or about the 8th December, found his fence broken down, and the marks of the horses passing through. Saw one of his horses that day in the bush, but did not get it for three weeks, and got the other in six weeks. Smith and himself had quarrelled. They were on bad terms. One Wm. Reid, a servant of Smith's, had been tried for stealing one of the horses and been acquitted last sessions.

Edward M'Grath, late servant of the prisoner, swore that on the evening of 6th Dec. he was offered £5 by Smith to steal Fullarton's mares, which he refused to do. That on the night of the 7th he saw the prisoner and other two men, Leach and Benton, break down Fullarton's fence, and take away the horses, bringing them into prisoner's stable. They saddled them, and Leach and Benton rode them away. Witness had a tent outside the house. Had been with Smith thirteen months. He remained with him up to the 24th January, and gave no information of the robbery till after that, not liking to be an informer. He heard Smith use threats of further injury to Fullarton after the horses were lost. He was turned off, and charged with stealing three half-crowns when he demanded his wages, an usual plan, he said, with Smith when wages were asked. The two abettors tried to make him drunk the night of the robbery. He had married a servant woman in Smith's house after the robbery, but had never communicated a word regarding the robbery to her from that time up to the prosent. Never said anything about it to his wife, nor combined with her as to their evidence. There were no other persons in the house but himself and the said Ellen Fenton, now his wife, and Smith's family.

Ellen M'Grath, wife of former witness, saw the mares brought to the yard by the parties aforenamed, there saddled and ridden away. Had given the prisoner a coat to put on before he went out, and watched from her bedroom window. Smith said next morning to her that Fullarton's mares were stolen. He answered that she knew it. A foal of one of the mares passed by, and Smith said to her, "What fools they were to have let it come back ; they should have cut its throat." Never told her husband a word about it, nor agreed as to what they should swear; never spoke about the trial to him; had other things to talk of. Never informed Fullarton of what she saw, and only told the police when Reid was taken up for stealing one of the mares. Was married after the robbery. They had their wedding dinner at Smith's, for which they paid. There was no one in the house but herself and Smith's family.

Mr. Ireland, for defendant, sought chiefly to discredit the two former witnesses, dwelling on the improbability or impossibility of their never having communicated on such a subject.

For the defence, J. L. Brown swore that he was in Smith's employ, and living at his house at the time of the mares being stolen, and that Smith was then absent at Melbourne from the 6th to the 10th December, and that what M'Grath said was false. He himself was about to leave.

Henry Potter had been also in Smith's employment, slept in the stable that night, and swore the same as last witness as to Smith's absence. Leach and Benton were also absent.

William Reid swore that he got off on his trial on M'Grath's evidence, who said to him, when he was discharged and left the court, that he only said what he did to get him off.

Ellen M'Grath had been offered money by Smith, but never said she would make all right if paid £20.

William Reid swore that she came to him, and asked him to tell Smith that if he gave her £20, to pay her passage to Van Diemen'sLand, she would be off.

The learned Judge summed up briefly, remarking on the incredibility of the witnesses, M'Grath and wife, who never communicated a word on all this matter to each other ; and that he could not see that the case for the prosecution was established on such evidence, leaving that for the jury to decide. Verdict, "Not Guilty."


1855 'CASTLEMAINE.', The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1956), 13 April, p. 5, viewed 27 August, 2012, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4806666
Creative Commons License © 2012. Australian Genealogy Journeys by Aillin O'Brien is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Australia License.Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at http://ausgenjourneys.blogspot.com.au/p/copyright-terms.html.

Sunday, August 26, 2012

P is for Peacock, Pettit, Pickis, Potter and Preston - Family History Through the Alphabet - Week 16

Image from Gould Genealogy & History News
This is my contribution to Week 16 of Gould Genealogy's Family History Through the Alphabet challenge. The letter this time is P. 

P is for...Peacock

Peacock is the maiden surname of my 4 x Great Grandmother, Ann Brown (1787-1831). Ann Peacock, the daughter of Peter Peacock and Ann Pettit, married Adam Brown, a carpenter, in 1810 at Chipping Ongar, Essex, England. Other locations in Essex relevant to my Peacock and Brown ancestors are: Abbess RodingFyfield, MoretonSouth Weald and Willingale

For information about my Peacock and Pettit ancestors I am very grateful to other Randall and Brown family researchers, particularly Robert and Kym. 


P is for...Pettit
Pettit is the maiden surname of my 5 x Great Grandmother, Ann Peacock (c1760-1801).  Ann's parents were Francis Pettit, parish clerk of Abbess Roding, and Sarah Bright (see my post B is for Bright). Ann's husband was Peter Peacock (c1760-1825). Their known children included: Ann, Sarah, Peter, William, Elizabeth, Charles, Maria and George. I still have a lot of research to complete regarding my Peacock and Pettit ancestors. 

The entry in the Abbess Roding parish register for the burial in 1801 of my 5 x Great Grandmother, Ann Peacock (nee Pettit), tells a very sad and unusual story: 
Anne Peacock, July 19th. In the Death of this Woman
there was something so peculiarly aweful, & instructing
instructing us all of whatsoever age to remember that
in the Midst of Life we are in Death, that it deserves
somewhat more than the common obituary Register.
Whilst sitting in her Cottage at Fyfield by the side
of a window she was struck dead by Lightning. An
Infant Daughter in her Arms escap'd altogether unin-
jur'd.  A decrepid, paralytick Mother was the unhappy 
Spectator of this melancholy Event; & a poor Boy, who
had taken Shelter from the Violence of the Storm.
She left behind her a Husband, & nine Children to
regret her Loss. In Consequence of this solemn Visita-
tion of Almighty God, & the Circumstances of her
young Family, the Bishop of London sent me
for their Relief 20 £ . To teach us to
number our Days, that we may apply our
Hearts unto Wisdom.
Source: St Edmund Church, Abbess Roding, Essex, England, Parish Records, Burial Register, 1786-1811. Essex Record Office D/P 145/1/4. Digital images available at Essex Ancestors

I am very grateful to Helene, a Peacock family researcher (who contacted me through GenesReunited in 2006) for alerting me to this entry in the Abbess Roding Burial Registers. 
Abbess Roding Church 2
St Edmund's Abbess Roding.
Photo from Flickr by Mark Seton used under
Creative Commons License CC-BY-NC-ND 2.0
P is for...Pickis
Pickis is the maiden surname of my 3 x Great Grandmother, Catherine Helen Atkinson (1824-1861). For more information about my Pickis ancestors, please see my recent L is for London post. 

P is for...Potter

Potter is the maiden surname of my Great Great Grandmother, Sophia Amelia Smith (1849-1922). Sophia was the daughter of George Augustus Potter and his second wife, Amelia Preston. Sophia was born 5 October 1849 and was baptised on 4 November 1849 in the parish of St George in the East, Middlesex, England. At that time George Potter's occupation was given as 'Marine Store Dealer' and the family were living at 2 Wapping Wall, Shadwell. The Potter family (George senior, Amelia and Sophia along with George junior and Harry, surviving children from George senior's first marriage) were still living at 2 Wapping Wall at the time of the 1851 Census. Another son, James William Potter, was born in 1851 and baptised at St George in the East on 8 June 1851. The family were still living at 2 Wapping Wall and George was still a Marine Store Dealer. 

George Potter, a widower and 'Ship Chandler', married Amelia Preston on Christmas Day 1848 at St James, Bermondsey, Surrey. George's first marriage was to Mary Anne Stone on 21 December 1840 at St Mary, Rotherhithe, Surrey. At that time George was a Policeman and his address was 'Paradise Street'.  The children from that marriage were as follows:

  • Harry Potter (1841-1914). Harry was born 6 November 1841 and baptised 5 December 1841 at St Mary Magdalene, Bermondsey, Surrey. At that time the Potter's were living at 'Cottage Row' and George was a Police Constable. 
  • George Potter (1843-1861). George junior was born 10 April 1843 and baptised 30 April 1843 at St Mary Magdalene, Bermondsey, Surrey. At that time the family were still living at 'Cottage Row' and George was described as a Policeman. 
  • Mary Ann Potter (1844-1844). Mary Ann was born 15 September 1844 and baptised 16 November 1844 at  Christ Church, Rotherhithe, Surrey. At that time the Potter's abode was described as being in 'Love Lane'. Mary Ann died aged two months and was buried on 20 November 1844 at Christ Church
  • Sophia Potter (1846-1846). Sophia was born 21 June 1846 and baptised 13 July 1846 at Christ Church, Rotherhithe, Surrey. At that time the Potter's home was still in 'Love Lane' and George was still described as a Policeman. Sophia died aged 3 weeks and was buried on 19 July 1846 at Christ Church
Amelia (name given on the passenger list as Mary Ann), George junior, Harry, Sophia and James emigrated to Victoria, Australia in 1855 on the 'Statesman'. It is believed George senior had emigrated some time earlier. The Potter family settled at Heathcote where George senior was involved in gold mining and had the 'Gold Miners Arms' hotel at Caledonia Gully. Amelia died at Heathcote in 1864. George Potter senior returned in England in 1881 where he married Amelia's sister, Sophia Preston. With Sophia, he returned to Victoria. George later held the National Hotel in Brunswick Street, Fitzroy, and the Victoria Hotel in Victoria Street, Footscray. George died there on 6 September 1891 (please see my post Sunday's Obituary - George Augustus Potter). 

George Augustus Potter was born in 1816 and baptised in the parish of St Giles, Oxford, Oxfordshire, the son of James Potter and Mary Hutton (see my post H is for Hutton). 

For information about my Potter ancestors I am very grateful to my third cousin, John. 

Sources:  Ancestry.com (London Parish Registers and 1851 UK Census), Victoria Births, Deaths and Marriages Indexes and several certificates.

P is for...Preston

Preston is the maiden surname of my 3 x Great Grandmother, Amelia Potter (1827-1864). Amelia was baptised in St Clement's Parish, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England in 1827, the daughter of Charles Preston, an upholsterer, and Elizabeth Heading (see my post H is for Heading). Charles Preston (1799-1832) was baptised in 1799 in the parish of St Thomas, Oxford, the son of James Preston (1762-1827, a college servant) and Ann Kersey (1762-1824) (see my post K is for Kersey). James Preston was baptised in the parish of St Martin, Oxford, in 1762, the son of Joseph Preston, a cooper, and Mary Best (see my post B is for Best). 
For information about my Preston ancestors I am very grateful to my third cousin, John. 

Creative Commons License © 2012. Australian Genealogy Journeys by Aillin O'Brien is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Australia License.Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at http://ausgenjourneys.blogspot.com.au/p/copyright-terms.html

Tuesday, August 21, 2012

O is for Oxfordshire - Family History Through the Alphabet - Week 15

Image from Gould Genealogy & History News
This is my contribution to Week 15 of Gould Genealogy's Family History Through the Alphabet challenge. The letter this time is O.


I will expand my O is for Oxfordshire post at a later date, but until then, here are some of my favourite Oxfordshire genealogy links. 


Creative Commons License Australian Genealogy Journeys by Aillin O'Brien is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Australia License.Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at  http://ausgenjourneys.blogspot.com.au/p/copyright-terms.html. .

N is for Northumberland - Family History Through the Alphabet - Week 14

Image from Gould Genealogy & History News
This is my contribution to Week 14 of Gould Genealogy's Family History Through the Alphabet challenge. The letter this time is N.

I will expand my N is for Northumberland post at a later date, but until then, here are some of my favourite Northumberland genealogy links. 
Creative Commons License Australian Genealogy Journeys by Aillin O'Brien is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Australia License.Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at http://ausgenjourneys.blogspot.com.au/p/copyright-terms.html.

Monday, August 13, 2012

In Loving Memory of my Gran

In Loving Memory of
my Gran, aged 93 years.
(1918-2012)

Eternal rest, grant unto her O Lord,
And may perpetual light shine upon her,
may her soul and the souls of all the faithful departed,
through the mercy of God, rest in peace.
Amen.  


Reunited with her loving husband, her parents, her brothers and sisters, her grandson and her great-grandson.

We love you Gran. 
Creative Commons License Australian Genealogy Journeys by Aillin O'Brien is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Australia License.Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at http://ausgenjourneys.blogspot.com.au/p/copyright-terms.html.

Tuesday, August 7, 2012

M is for Marrows, Matthews, McAllister, McCarthy, McMahon and Mulhall - Family History Through the Alphabet - Week 13

Image from Gould Genealogy & History News
This is my contribution to Week 13 of Gould Genealogy's Family History Through the Alphabet challenge. The letter this time is M.

M is for...Marrows
Marrows is the maiden surname of my 3 x Great Grandmother, Maria Chambers (c1789-1867).
Maria Marrows, of the parish of Rand, married Thomas Chambers, of the parish of Repham (Reepham?), by Banns, on 9 March 1812 at Rand, Lincolnshire, England by J.C. Younge, curate of Walesby. The witnesses to the marriage were Francis Liversidge and John Marrows.
Thomas and Maria had at least nine children: Charlotte, John, Mary Ann, Harriet, Anne, Elizabeth, Jane, George (my 2 x Great Grandfather) and William. The children were baptised at RandBarlings and LangworthBracebridge Heath and Sudbrooke, Lincolnshire

At the time of the 1841 Census Thomas Chambers, an agricultural labourer, Maria Chambers and their children William, George, Jane and Elizabeth, were living at Bracebridge Heath, LincolnshireIn the 1851 Census farmer Thomas Chambers, Maria Chambers, daughter Jane Chambers and grandchildren George Chambers (aged 12) and Jane Nickleson (aged 3) were living at Letby House, Flaxton, Yorkshire. The place of birth for all of these people was given as Lincolnshire. 

Thomas Chambers died on 4 October 1858 at 21 Rasen Lane, Lincoln, Lincolnshire, aged 65 years. The informant listed on Thomas' death certificate was Mary Nuttall of 7 Good Lane, Lincoln. At the time of the 1861 Census, the widowed Maria, a needlewoman aged 72 years, and her daughter Jane (aged 30), were living at 7 Nash Square, Lincoln (I could not find Nash Square on a modern map. If anyone knows where this place is/was, I would appreciate it if you could leave a comment on this post. Thanks.) Maria's birthplace was given on the Census as Middle Rasen, LincolnshireShe died on 26 June 1867 at 3 Good Lane, Lincoln, Lincolnshire. Her age was given as 79 on her death certificate. The informant listed on the certificate was Maria Cropper of 32 Newport, Lincoln, Lincolnshire. I still have a lot of research to complete regarding my Marrows family. (See also C is for Chambers)

M is for...Matthews
Matthews is the maiden surname of my 6 x Great Grandmother, Amelia Heading (1729-1808). Amelia was baptised in 1729 in Stanford-in-the-Vale, Berkshire, England, the daughter of William Matthews (1690-1747) and Mary (nee Hunsdon). William (b1690) was the son of William and Elizabeth (nee Gascoigne) Matthews. Amelia Matthews (1729-1808) married John Heading in 1747 at Denchworth, Berkshire. Amelia died at Denchworth in 1808. I have more information on the Matthews family but I still have to organise the information. (See also H is for Heading)

M is for...McAllister
McAllister is the maiden surname of my 4 x Great Grandmother, Mary Breen. Very little verified information is known about Mary or her family. All that I know is that she was the wife of Hugh Breen, and the mother of my 3 x Great Grandfather, Owen Breen (c1800-1875) and his brother Patrick Breen (c1798-1883) of Aghadavoyle, County Armagh, Ireland. The family story, handed down from Mary's grandson Michael O'Brien (c1833-1925) is that Sam McAllister, who died at the battle of Derrynamuck, County Wicklow in 1799 (helping Michael Dwyer to escape), was a brother/close relative of Mary (see also The Ballad of Michael Dwyer on the Dwyer Clan web site, and Dwyer McAllister Cottage photograph on Flickr). Sam was thought to have come from County Antrim so it is probable that my McAllister's originate there. (See also B is for Breen)

M is for...McCarthy
My earliest known McCarthy ancestors are James McCarthy and Mary Duggan (see D is for Duggan). Their son John McCarthy (1806-1870) was my 3 x Great Grandfather. John McCarthy married Honora 
Tangney in 1832 in the Catholic parish of Firies, County Kerry, Ireland. Their children were: James, John, Jeremiah, Dennis, Patrick, Mary and Michael. It is believed that James, Jeremiah, Dennis and Mary died as infants. John (1835-1885) immigrated to Victoria, Australia on the 'Lighning' in 1862. Patrick (c1843-1925) immigrated to Victoria in 1863 on the 'Champion of the Seas'. John McCarthy Snr (1806-1870), his wife Honora (nee Tangney) (c1806-1873) and son Michael McCarthy (1851-?), along with Patrick's wife Ellen McCarthy (nee O'Sullivan) (1841-1925) and Ellen's infant son John (1864-1936), immigrated to Victoria in 1866 on the 'White Star'.

The McCarthy's lived at Heathcote, Victoria and were involved in gold mining, farm labouring, wood cutting, blacksmithing and road work. Both John Snr and Honora McCarthy died at Heathcote. Patrick and Ellen McCarthy lived in Heathcote and Lancefield and had 10 children. It is not known what became of Michael McCarthy.

My 2 x Great Grandfather, John McCarthy (1835-1885) married Catherine Mannix (1842-1917) at St Francis' Catholic Church, Melbourne in 1864. John and Catherine had nine children: Honora (Nora, Mrs Murphy), Mary Ann (Mrs Ryan), Patrick (Paddy, my Great Grandfather), John (Johnny), Margaret (Mag, Mrs Travers), Michael (Mick), James (Jim), Edward (Ted) and Denis (Din). John (b1835) died at Heathcote in 1885 several hours after he was kicked by draught horse. To support her family, Catherine worked from home as a seamstress making shirts for Christie's General Merchants in Heathcote. Catherine died at Heathcote in 1917. 


M is also for Mannix which I will cover in a later Family History Through the Alphabet post. 

M is for...McMahon
McMahon is the maiden surname of my 3 x Great Grandmother, Ann Hehir. Ann was the wife of Timothy (Thaddeus) Hehir, a farmer of Killow, Clareabbey, County Clare, Ireland, and the mother of my 2 x Great Grandmother, Susan Hehir (c1833-1921). It is believed that Ann Hehir (nee McMahon) died in the 1840s during the Great famine. Nothing more is known about her family or relatives. (See also H is for Hehir)

M is for...Mulhall
Mulhall is the maiden surname of my 2 x Great Grandmother, Mary Joyce (1844-1923). Mary Mulhall was baptised in 1844 in the Catholic parish of Tubberclaire, County Westmeath, Ireland, the daughter of Matthew Mulhall and Margaret (nee Coghlan). 

There are only three Mulhall's in County Westmeath in the
 Griffiths Primary Valuations: Matthew Mulhall of Lissakillen South (parish of Bunown), John Mulhall of Boyanagh (parish of Kilcleagh) and Robert Mulhall of Killogeenaghan (parish of Kilcleagh). My unverified theory at the moment is that these Mulhall's were brothers and Matthew of Lissakillen South was probably Mary's father. Mary's siblings who immigrated to Australia included Catherine (Kate) (1848-1894) (see my Waitangi Day 2011 post for more about Kate), Ann (1851-1885) who married William Hayes at Echuca in 1876, and a brother, 'M. Mulhall', who was the informant of Kate's death in 1894 and was listed on her death certificate as 'M. Mulhall, Brother, S. Melbourne' (South Melbourne). Irish records also indicate that Matthew and Margaret (nee Coghlan) had at least one other child, named John Mulhall (b1856). (See also J is for Joyce and C is for Coghlan)

M is also for...much more research and organising that I need to do.

(Sources available on request)
Creative Commons License Australian Genealogy Journeys by Aillin O'Brien is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Australia License.Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at http://ausgenjourneys.blogspot.com.au/p/copyright-terms.html.

Monday, August 6, 2012

Motivation Monday - Goals for August 2012

My goals for July 2012 were:
  1.  Continue exploring my recent test results from FamilyTreeDNA and write another Genetic Genealogy blog post. Achieved. 
  2.  Begin implementing the Digital Organisational Scheme I developed back in January as part of Michelle Goodrum's 21st Century Organized Family Historian challenges. During July I will aim to start implementing my scheme for naming formats and metadata/tags, beginning with my Genealogy>Hehir folder. Achieved partially. I still have a bit of work to do, but I have started. 
  3.  Continue working on my new Legacy file, working backwards methodically, recording all sources, attaching relevant source documents and attaching photographs. During July, I aim to do this for my Hehir family. Achieved partially. My Legacy file now contains 101 individuals, 35 unique surnames, 30 families and 10 master source entries. 
  4.  Move a few more photographs from my 'To Sort' folder into folders for the relevant year and month. At the time of posting my 'To Sort' photographs folder contains 3,396 Files, 188 Folders, 8.0 GB of data. During July I aim to reduce the number of files in my 'To Sort' photographs folder to at least 2,500. Achieved. My 'To Sort' photo folder now contains 1,373 files, 41 Folders and 3.37 GB of data.  
  5.  Continue reading Photoshop Elements 10 All-in-One For Dummies. At the moment I am up to page 506, I will aim to read up to at least page 622 (finish) by the end of July. Achieved.
  6.  Participate in blogging prompts when able (Family History Through the Alphabet52 Weeks of Abundant Genealogy21st Century Organized Family Historian and Beyond the Internet). Achieved. During July I participated in the Family History Through the Alphabet challenge for the letters I, J and K
My goals for August 2012 are:
  1. Continue implementing the Digital Organisational Scheme I developed back in January. During August I will aim to continue working on the file names and metadata within my 'Genealogy>Hehir' and 'Genealogy>Ellis' folders. I will particularly concentrate on organising the files within each 'Correspondence' folder. 
  2. Continue working on my new Legacy file, working backwards methodically, recording all sources, attaching relevant source documents and attaching photographs. During August, I aim to do this for more of my Hehir and Ellis family members. At the the time of posting my Legacy file contains 101 individuals. During August I will aim to increase that number to at least 150. 
  3. Move a few more photographs from my 'To Sort' folder into folders for the relevant year and month. At the time of posting my 'To Sort' photographs folder contains 1,373 Files, 41 Folders, 3.37 GB of data. During August I aim to reduce the number of files in my 'To Sort' photographs folder to 0. 
  4. Continue exploring my recent genetic genealogy test results. Contact a few more of my Dad's matches at FTDNA. 
  5. At the moment I am reading two genealogy related ebooks. During August I will aim to finish at least one of these ebooks. 
  6. Participate in blogging prompts when able (Family History Through the Alphabet, 52 Weeks of Abundant Genealogy, 21st Century Organized Family Historian and Beyond the Internet)

Creative Commons License Australian Genealogy Journeys by Aillin O'Brien is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Australia License.Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at http://ausgenjourneys.blogspot.com.au/p/copyright-terms.html.

Wednesday, August 1, 2012

L is for London - Family History Through the Alphabet - Week 12

Image from Gould Genealogy & History News
This is my contribution to Week 12 of Gould Genealogy's Family History Through the Alphabet challenge. The letter this time is L. I have no direct ancestors with a surname beginning with L, so I have again decided to write about a location.

L is for...London
The vast majority of my ancestors were rural folk. However, two large English cities feature in my family history - London and Oxford. London features in two branches of my family tree, the Pickis family and the Potter family. I have decided, for the purposes of this blog post, to focus on the London locations relevant to my Pickis family. The FamilySearch Wiki has a useful Guide to London Ancestors which is a great place to start in my quest to learn about London locations from my family history.

My 4 x Great Grandparents, Robert Paul Pickis and Elizabeth Bond, were married in 1822 in the parish of All Hallows Barking. So far I have only found their marriage on an index and I still need to view the actual entry of marriage in the parish register. My 3 x Great Grandmother, Catherine Helen Pickis (born 3 February 1824), and her sister Elizabeth Pickis (born 12 Jun 1822), were both baptised on 26 September 1824 in the parish of All Hallows the Great

All Hallows the Great. 
Engraving by Joseph Skelton, after John Coney. 
[Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons 


A contemporary description of the parish of All Hallows the Great. Extract from: Weed, B. London parishes: containing the situation, antiquity, and re-building of the churches within the bills of mortality, London, 1824, p. 24.
Robert Paul Pickis, a carpenter, and Elizabeth his wife, gave their abode at the time of the baptisms as 32 Great Bush Lane. A Bush Lane, off Cannon Street, still exists in London today and can be seen on Google Maps.

On 25 June 1826, another Pickis child, a son, Robert Paul Pickis (born 28 April 1826), was baptised at All Hallows the Great.

By 26 September 1827 when a fourth Pickis child, a daughter Mary, was baptised in the parish of St Thomas Apostle, the Pickis' place of abode was described as 'No. 9. Tower Royal'. Little Mary Ann, according to the parish registers of St Mary Aldermary died of Convulsions on 1 October 1827 when she was just 13 days old. She was buried in churchyard of the St Thomas Apostle. An 1848 image of the St Thomas Apostle churchyard is available in the British Museum Collection.

Elizabeth (nee Bond) Pickis, died in November 1839 and was buried on 4 November 1839 in the parish of St Thomas Apostle. At that time the Pickis' abode was described as No. 2 Bell Yard, Gracechurch Street. Robert, Elizabeth jnr., Catherine and Robert jnr. were still living at No. 2 Bell Yard at the time of the 1841 census. It is believed that Robert Paul Pickis was probably the 45-year-old porter Robert Pickis who died on 25 September 1844 at the Marlborough Poor House, Peckham, Surrey.

Robert Paul Pickis (1797-1844?) was the son of Paul Pickis and Elizabeth Blows. Paul and Elizabeth were married (by Banns) in the parish of Finsbury St Luke on 23 February 1794. The marriage witnesses were Cuthbert Scarborough and E. Dobson. Paul, a carpenter, and Elizabeth, had the following children:

  • Maria Pickis, baptised 19 April 1795, St Mary Whitechapel, Middlesex. The Pickis' address at the time was described as Goodman's Yard
  • Robert Paul Pickis, baptised 5 November 1797 in St Mary Whitechapel, Middlesex. Address: Goodman's Yard.
  • Mary Ann Pickis, baptised 14 April 1799, at Sion Chapel, Union Street, Mile End Old Town.
  • Mary Pickis, baptised 2 August 1801, St Mary Whitechapel, Middlesex. Address: Lambeth Street. 
  • James Pickis, baptised 28 November 1802, St Mary Whitechapel, Middlesex. Address: Lambeth Street. 
  • Emma Pickis, baptised 28 March 1804, St Mary Whitechapel, Middlesex. Address: Lambeth Street. 
  • Ann Pickis, born 16 February 1810, baptised 8 April 1810, St Mary Whitechapel, Middlesex. Address: Lambeth Street. 
Paul Pickis died in 1831 and was buried at the Globe Fields Wesleyan Burial Ground on 23 Jan 1831. Elizabeth (nee Blows) Pickis was living with daughter Emma Kefford (nee Pickis) in High Street, Hackney at the time of the 1841 Census. Elizabeth died at West Hackney on 13 July 1847 (aged 81) and was buried at Stoke Newington Church Street Independent.

Sources:
  • Ancestry.com. London, England, Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1538-1812[database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Original data: Church of England Parish Registers, 1538-1812. London, England: London Metropolitan Archives. London Metropolitan Archives, Saint Mary, Whitechapel, Register of baptisms, Jun 1792 - Dec 1812, P93/MRY1, Item 012.
  • Ancestry.com. London, England, Marriages and Banns, 1754-1921 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Original data: Church of England Parish Registers, 1754-1921. London Metropolitan Archives, London. London Metropolitan Archives, Saint Luke, Old Street, Register of marriages, P76/LUK, Item 034.
  • Ancestry.com. 1841 England Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc, 2010.Original data: Census Returns of England and Wales, 1841. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1841. Class: HO107; Piece: 719; Book: 7; Civil Parish: Allhallows Lombard Street; County: Middlesex; Enumeration District: 1; Folio: 10; Page: 15; Line: 4; GSU roll: 438826. Class: HO107; Piece: 700; Book: 1; Civil Parish: St John Hackney; County: Middlesex; Enumeration District: 2; Folio: 40; Page: 24; Line: 12; GSU roll: 438813.
  • Ancestry.com. London, England, Births and Baptisms, 1813-1906 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Original data: Board of Guardian Records, 1834-1906 and Church of England Parish Registers, 1754-1906. London Metropolitan Archives, London. 
  • Ancestry.com. London, England, Deaths and Burials, 1813-1980 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Original data: Board of Guardian Records, 1834-1906 and Church of England Parish Registers, 1813-1906. London Metropolitan Archives, London. London Metropolitan Archives, St Thomas Apostle, Register of burials, 1813 - 1849, P69/TMS1/A/014/MS09014; Call Number: Guildhall: P69/TMS1/A/01/Ms 9014. London Metropolitan Archives, St Mary Aldermary, Burial fees account book, 1813 -1838, P69/MRY3/A/013/MS04866; Call Number: Guildhall: P69/MRY3/A/01/Ms 4866.
  • FindMyPast.co.uk - Boyds Marriage Index 1538-1840 
  • www.bmdregisters.co.uk
  • "England and Wales, Non-Conformist Record Indexes (RG4-8)," index, FamilySearch(https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FWHW-JZ7 : accessed 01 Aug 2012), Paul Pickis, 23 Jan 1831. 
  • "England and Wales, Non-Conformist Record Indexes (RG4-8)," index, FamilySearch(https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FQZQ-LBZ : accessed 01 Aug 2012), Mary Ann Pickis, 14 Apr 1799. 
  • "England and Wales, Non-Conformist Record Indexes (RG4-8)," index, FamilySearch(https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/FQ5W-2PX : accessed 01 Aug 2012), Elizabeth Pickis, 13 Jul 1847.

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