Monday, April 25, 2011

ANZAC Day - WWI Soldiers from my family tree who gave their lives - Lest we forget

This ANZAC Day, April 25th, I would like to create a blog post as a tribute to several of the World War I soldiers from my family tree who gave their lives. 

George Brown FULLERTON, DCM (1890-1917)

George Brown FULLERTON was born on 18 March 1890 at Avonmore near Elmore, Victoria, Australia. He was the youngest son (and eighth child) of Peter and Dorothea (nee ATKINSON) FULLERTON. George is my Great Great Uncle. 

George enlisted on the 17 February 1916 in the 38th Battalion of the Australian Infantry Forces (AIF). He embarked from Melbourne on the Runic on 20 June 1916. He spent time training at the Salisbury Plains in England, from where he sent letters home to his family. 


George served on the Western Front. He died on 12 June 1917 from wounds received during the Battle of Messines. He was buried in the Trois-Abres Cemetery, Steenwerk, France.

My Grandma, George's niece (born in 1912) remembered the local Catholic Priest arriving at her house to inform her mother (George's sister) of George's death. She remembered sewing black on her hat for mourning. 

George posthumously received the Distinguished Conduct Medal for 'Great gallantry, coolness and devotion to duty during operations south of Messines on 7 June 1917'
A printed copy of a letter sent to George Brown FULLERTON's mother, 17 June 1917.
FULLERTON.- In loving memory of Corporal George Fullerton, D.C.M., who died of wounds in France on June 12, 1917. One of the unreturning brave. -(Inserted by Mr. and Mrs. P. Fullerton and family, Avonmore.) (Source: Family Notices. (1919, June 14). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848-1954), p. 13. Retrieved April 25, 2011, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1478643)

More about George Brown FULLERTON: 

Harold Heathcote Hayes CHAMBERS (1895-1915)

H. CHAMBERS.
AUSTRALIANS WHO HAVE FALLEN. (1915, June 11).
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848-1954), p. 6.
Retrieved April 24, 2011,
from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1523598

Harold Heathcote Hayes CHAMBERS was born in 1895 at Heathcote, Victoria, Australia, the second son of George and Annie (nee SIMS) CHAMBERS. Harold was a nephew of my Great Grandmother Millicent McCARTHY (nee CHAMBERS). 


Harold worked as a draper and lived in Kyneton, Victoria with his family. He enlisted August 1914 in the 7th Battalion of the AIF. Harold died at Gallipoli of wounds received between 25 and 28 April 1915. He was buried at the Beach Cemetery, Gallipoli. 


CORPORAL H. CHAMBERS.
Corporal Harold Chambers (killed) was a son of Mr. George Chambers, of Kyneton. He was a member of the Kyneton Lacrosse Club, taking part in all their matches during recent years. His 20th birthday was on December 24 last. 
(Source: AUSTRALIAN LOSSES. (1915, June 9). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848-1954), p. 11. Retrieved April 24, 2011, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1523022

CHAMBERS— Harold H. H., aged 20, son of George Chambers, Kyneton, grandson of George Chambers, Avoca, killed in action at the Dardanelles, May 22.  (Source: Family Notices. (1915, June 7). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848-1954), p. 1. Retrieved April 24, 2011, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1522241

More about Harold Heathcote Hayes CHAMBERS:




S. CHAMBERS.
AUSTRALIANS WHO HAVE FALLEN. (1915, November 1).
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848-1954), p. 7.
Retrieved April 24, 2011,
from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1576692
Stanley CHAMBERS (1896-1915)

Stanley CHAMBERS was born in 1896 at Newlyn near Ballarat, Victoria, the eldest son of John and Elizabeth (nee JONES) CHAMBERS. Stanley was a nephew of my Great Grandmother Millicent McCARTHY (nee CHAMBERS) and a first cousin of Harold CHAMBERS mentioned above. 


Stanley enlisted in September 1914 in the 8th Light Horse Regiment. Stanley died of wounds received at Gallipoli on 24 September 1915. He was buried at the Embarkation Pier Cemetery.

TROOPER S CHAMBERS (killed in action on September 23) was the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Chambers, of Ligar street, Soldiers' Hill, Ballarat, and grandson of Mr. George Chambers, of Avoca. He joined the 8th Light Horse. Being injured in January, owing to a horse falling on him, he was not able to get away until June, when he went to the front with the 6th Reinforcements, 3rd Brigade. He was educated at the MacArthur street school, and was a scholar at St. John's   Church of England Sunday-school. He was only 19 years of age. (Source: ROLL OF HONOUR. (1915, October 28). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848-1954), p. 7. Retrieved April 24, 2011, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1575838)
CHAMBERS. - Killed in action, on September 23, at the Dardanelles, Trooper Stan Chambers, 8th Light Horse, eldest dearly loved son of John and Elizabeth Chambers, 606 Ligar street, Ballarat, and grandson of G. Chambers, of Avoca, aged 19. He rose, responsive to his country's call,  And gave for her his best - his life, his all. (Source: Family Notices. (1915, October 21). The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848-1954), p. 1. Retrieved April 24, 2011, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1573084


More about Stanley CHAMBERS:

These are just three World War I soldiers from my family tree who gave their lives. I know there are others on more distant branches of my tree too, as well as young men who returned from WWI and veterans of other wars too. This ANZAC day post is in remembrance of them as well. 

Lest we forget.

This blog post has been created as part of the Trans-Tasman ANZAC Day Blog Challenge. You can learn more about ANZAC Day here.

Useful Links:
(Sources available on request).
Copyright © 2011 Australian Genealogy Journeys.

6 comments:

  1. Like Harold Heathcote Hayes Chambers my grandfather's cousin was born in Heathcote and was named Franklin Heathcote Dawson. Was it popular to name children after the town they were born or was it just a Heathcote thing? Franklin was also named after the town his father was born in Tasmania.

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  2. Great Post, Aillin

    Although they relate sad storiesI am enloying this series of posts.

    A wonderful way to reflect on ANZAC Day

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  3. A great post. You must be really proud of George, although whatever the contribution, our ancestors have a way of making us proud of them.

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  4. Thank you Aillin for sharing these mens' stories. They gave so much.

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  5. Such a great post Aillin and really well laid out.

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  6. I often think of Great Uncle George Fullerton, especially around Anzac Day. Hoping to visit his grave in the not to distant future. Lest we forget.

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Your comments are appreciated. Thanks.

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